Sour Dough Bread & Buttermilk Biscuits

Sour dough breadOne of the things that makes 1844 House unique to our community is our passion for freshness and preparing food from scratch.  Our talented team of committed young chefs work hard each day transforming fresh local ingredients into our award winning cuisine.

Many of our guests are surprised when they find that we make almost everything that we serve here in our kitchen.  From the croutons, dressings, stocks and sauces; to our fresh cut steaks from local meat and all of our desserts, sorbets & ice creams.  We simply love to cook, and it shows in the quality of our food.  This is what culinary passion looks like.

While we proudly offer organic country white bread from the local bakery in our bread baskets, we also love to complement it with our  own fresh baked breads.  In this case, it is a potato sour dough.  I love to bake different kinds of bread and experiment with sponges, starters and dough’s.

Buttermilk BiscuitsI also love biscuits!  It must be my southern heritage.  So when I get the craving, I will bake up a batch for myself and a maybe even a few for our guests.  In the picture to the left, the large one is for my staff and myself and the smaller ones were for the guests.  They were great smeared with my home made hot pepper jelly (with peppers from our Chefs’ garden) and cream cheese.

Any of these breads are a wonderful start to a great meal here at 1844 House; especially when you enjoy them with our signature flavored butters.  Just think, if we put this much passion into a product we don’t even charge for; how much passion goes into everything else.

We look forward to seeing you soon.

Bon Appetite!  Chef Brian

Seared Scallops

Seared Scallops with sweet corn, English pea, and fresh fennel risotto.To complement the amazing New England scallops we brought in for this evenings featured entree; Chef Arthur did not have to look much further than our own gardens and a farm just around the corner….

 

Seared Scallops
Sweet corn, English Pea and fresh fennel risotto, heirloom tomato vinaigrette, spicy roasted chili cream.

Bon Appetite!  Chef Brian

 

Duck Leg Confit

House Made Duck ConfitTo many people, it may feel like summer is nearly over; there are only 3 weeks until September.  Here in upstate NY our summer crops are just beginning to come to market.  While we are enjoying the bounties of the current harvests, as chefs, we must also be looking forward to the next season.  When beans and peas come in (green, sugar snap, snow, pole, haricot verte, etc) there are bushels of them and every farm has them for sale.  But it won’t be long before the season for them is over and they cannot be found.  That is why we pickle, brine, freeze, ferment and otherwise preserve many summer foods so that we can enjoy them in different forms throughout the fall and winter season.

Dilly BeansWe are currently making dilly beans, sauerkraut, pickles, freezing sweet corn (think chowders and fritters) and berries, making jams as well as curing local meats.

A great example of curing meat for the next season is duck confit.  This year I am fortunate to have a local farm (M&M Eggs) raising a flock of ducks for us.  They are heritage breed ducks that have a deep and robust flavor.  They are also quite a bit larger than farm raised ducks.  As most of my regular guests know, I am a huge fan of charcuterie (cured meats).  So I will prepare many of them into duck confit.  Confit is a process for preserving the meat for use over long periods.  Normally, only the legs are cured, but I cure the whole duck.  (The wings are a real treat that I enjoy saving for myself and our staff.)  It begins by rubbing the duck down with a mixture of salt and a proprietary blend of herbs and spices and curing the meat to remove the excess moisture. Then the meat is rinsed and slow cooked fully submerged in duck fat until the meat is tender and easily pulls from the bone.  The duck is then cooled and preserved in the fat.  We will be using the confit as a filling for our Duck Ravioli as well as a component on our Autumn Charcuterie Board on the fall menu.

I hope you are able to get to your local farmers market and take advantage of the wonderful variety of fresh food. While you are there, think about what you can do to preserve some of the bounty for your home table in the next season.  If you are too busy…..don’t worry, we have your back!  We look forward to seeing you soon.

Bon Appetite!  Chef Brian

Seared Scallops with Local Shiitake Mushrooms

Local Shiitake MushroomsThis weekend we were fortunate enough to get some freshly harvested shiitake mushrooms from Bob Wagner at Northwoods Shiitake Farm .  It was a surprise to get them because we are experiencing a very warm and dry summer and these tasty little mushrooms require a certain amount of moisture in order to bloom.  Like most farmers, Bob found an innovative way to help nature along by soaking his logs in river water to facilitate the bloom.  The result is beautiful firm mushrooms that are perfect for many types of preparations including the dish we created for this weekends featured entree.

Scallops & ShiitakesWe look forward to next summer when we anticipate the first harvest from our own shiitake farm that we installed with help and guidance from Bob earlier this summer.  It is a great lesson in patience when you realize that there is a 12 month wait for your first crop.  Fortunately, we are able to enjoy the bounty this year from Northwoods Farm.

Seared Scallops with Crispy Shiitake Mushrooms
Seared diver scallops, sweet local corn and fresh herb risotto, crispy shiitake mushrooms, tomato-saffron beurre fondue.

Bon Appetite!  Chef Brian