Tag Archives: #eatlocal

Pan Seared Mushroom Mille Feuille

Pan Seared Mushroom Mille FeuilleToday I worked on creating a new vegetarian dish for our winter menu. Although I am not sure this is going to be a permanent menu item, it is definitely one I will be repeating.

One important aspect of vegetarian dining for me is a combination of different textures. I was inspired by German strudel pastry as I read through a holiday baking book, so I started with a box of phyllo dough.  I began brushing layers of of the dough with beaten egg and sprinkling fresh herb infused bread crumbs between the layers.  Then I baked the pastry layers until they were crispy.  This is why I used the term “mille feuille” which translates from French to “thousand leaves” to describe these delicious crispy layers.  For additional texture I chose shiitake and crimini mushrooms as well as some kale from my garden.  By slicing the mushrooms thick and searing them quickly in brown butter they retain a wonderful chewiness that satisfies the palate much like meat.  Finally, needed something to bind it all together.   For this I chose some  sweet organic parsnips that we purchased from BirdsFoot Farm.  Combined with just a dollop of goat cheese between each layer it adds the perfect creaminess to balance the crisp and chewy textures.

This is one of those vegetarian dishes that might just win over a few carnivores.   We look forward to seeing you soon!

Bon Appetite! Chef Brian

Pan Seared Mushroom Mille Feuille
Forest mushrooms, tender kale, sweet parsnip puree
& creamy goat cheese between layers of crisp
phyllo & herbs.

Duck Confit

Duck Confit with potato gnocchiMy favorite time of year for cooking is finally here and we have just launched our new fall menu.  Over the next week or so, I will be sharing pictures and stories about our new menu items on our page.

The first dish I would like to introduce is my favorite dish on the fall menu that is a completely new addition; the Duck Confit.  Duck Confit has been one of my favorite ways to enjoy duck since I first encountered it as a student at The Culinary Institute of America.  I was very excited when a local farmer approached me about using his duck on our menu.  He raises ducks for egg production, so he was looking for an outlet for his male ducks.  He brought me a sample duck, and I decided to prepare the entire duck confit style.  It was delicious!  My kitchen staff and I enjoyed preparing it in many ways and enjoying it for lunch for several days.

House Made Duck ConfitFor those of you who do not know what “confit” is, here is a very simplified explanation.  This method is an old world style of preserving meat so it wont spoil as quickly.  The duck is butchered and rubbed with a cure/spice mixture and pressed for a couple of days.  This allows the salt to extract the moisture from the meat, while the meat absorbs the spice flavor.  Then the meat is rinsed to remove all the excess salt and spices and allowed to dry out on a rack in the cooler until a pellicle (dry skin) forms on the surface.  Then the meat is submerged in a bath of hot duck fat and slow cooked until the meat is tender and falls off the bone, similar to pulled pork.  The meat is cooled in the fat to allow it to reabsorb some of the fat and to prevent the air from getting to the meat.  The absence of water/moisture and air preserve the meat.

The final preparation came about kind of “on the fly” one afternoon as I was doing some early morning cooking.  My intention was to get some cooking done early, then hand off the kitchen to my Sous Chef and enjoy a weekend in Lake Placid with our GM, Barry as he celebrated his 40th birthday.  Unfortunately, my Sous Chef became ill, and I had to cancel my weekend.  I wanted to celebrate with Barry anyway, so I went into my kitchen and invented this dish.  We enjoyed it with some fresh baked baguette and a wonderful bottle of Super Tuscan wine.  It was a great lunch with a great friend.  Sometimes the best dishes just come out of nowhere.

Duck Confit
M&M Farm Duck Confit with Northwoods Farm mushrooms, brandy-peppercorn sauce and potato gnocchi.  Served in a “nest” of organic baby arugula that is dressed with truffle oil, Pecorino cheese and fresh ground pepper and topped with a poached duck egg.

Bon Appetite!  Chef Brian

Beef Carpaccio

Beef CarpaccioWhen purchasing local beef, the challenge to the chef is to create dishes that help utilize the entire animal, not just the major cuts like filet mignon, rib eye’s, and NY strip steaks.  Donahue’s Farm is raising some delicious Angus beef, and we serve it here in several ways.  For this dish I selected the eye round.  This is typically a very difficult piece of meat to use; as it lacks any marbling and can be very chewy when cooked.  It is perfect for this dish for two reasons….the first, is that I can get it fresh from Tri-town the day after it is processed and freshness is very important when you are consuming raw meat.  The second, is that this meat has great beef flavor and serving it so thinly sliced allows it to have a good texture for this dish.

This dish is great for a warm summer day when a salad is your choice for a satisfying meal.

Beef Carpaccio
Thinly sliced Donahue’s Farm beef, baby arugula, shaved Reggiano cheese, Italian herb pesto, truffle oil, sea salt, fresh ground pepper.

It’s simple, elegant, and delicious!

Bon Appetite!  Chef Brian